How To Flush DNS

How to clear the DNS Cache on a computer and web browsers


Introduction

Do you have experience opening a website but the website doesn't want to open it? Once checked, it turns out only on your computer that can not open the website. Why so? Is my computer troubled? Hmm, do not panic! All that is due to DNS cache on the computer that has not been deleted. So now all you have to do is delete its DNS cache. Want to know how? Follow the instructions on how to delete the following DNS Cache.

Aim

Delete the DNS Cache that is on the computer

Preparation phase

All you have to prepare is a computer/laptop and a bit of knowledge about DNS. What is DNS? Please read

What is DNS Cache?

DNS cache is a database on the browser and computer that functions to store IP addresses from frequently visited web servers. If the IP address on the website has changed, then the DNS cache on your computer also needs to be updated before you can access the website again.

How DNS Cache Works

For example, you want to visit the domainesia.com website. In the past, the web browser will ask the IP address of the domainesiaesia.com domain to DNS Server with IP Address 102.23.11.65. Well, then the operating system on the computer will store the data "that IP 102.23.11.65 belongs to domainesia.com" to DNS Cache.
Then a year later, you want to extend your hosting and open domainesia.com again. For that DNS Cache will direct your web browser to IP address belonging to domainesia.com using data from DNS Cache.

How to Delete DNS Cache 

Well, the IP Address of the website can change. For that, so that the website can be accessed when you have to delete DNS Cache or commonly referred to as flush / clear DNS cache. The method varies depending on the operating system used. Here's how to flush DNS cache based on each operating system.

Why could flush the DNS Resolver Cache restoration whatever?

From time to time an IP copes with to a domain may additionally change. If the DNS Resolver Cache has the old IP cope with the record, it could result in your computer not being able to reach the website online. Cached facts can also come to be corrupt. Therefore, clearing it is a step you may take on every occasion you can not hook up with a site.

How to Flush DNS

most operating structures and DNS clients will robotically cache IP addresses and other DNS consequences, this is accomplished as a way to speed up subsequent requests to the equal hostname. Once in a while, terrible results may be cached and therefore need to be cleared from the cache so as on the way to communicate with the host correctly. All essential operating systems can help you pressure this process. Outlined under are the commonplace steps you'll want to follow that allows you to flush your DNS cache.





Microsoft Windows

Windows 10

Flushing the DNS cache on Windows 10 is a very easy process. Due to system security permissions, you must ensure that you run the command prompt as an administrator user.

Ensure that you're on the Windows 10 desktop.
Right click on the start menu and choose Command Prompt (Admin) from the menu.
Type in the command ipconfig /flushdns 

Windows® 8

Press Win+X to open the WinX Menu.
Right-click on Command Prompt and select Run as Administrator.
Type the following command and press Enter: ipconfig /flushdns
If the command was successful, you will see the following message: Windows IP configuration successfully flushed the DNS Resolver Cache.

Windows 7

Flushing DNS on newer versions of Windows is almost as easy as the earlier versions but due to Microsoft's security additions you must run the command prompt with administrator privileges.

Click the Start button.
Enter cmd in the Start menu search field.
Right-click on Command Prompt and select Run as Administrator.
Type the following command and press Enter: ipconfig /flushdns
If the command was successful, you will see the following message:
Windows IP configuration successfully flushed the DNS Resolver Cache.

Windows XP, 2000, or Vista®

Click the Start button.
On the Start menu, click Run….
If you do not see the Run command in Vista, enter run in the Search bar.
Type the following command in the Run text box:
ipconfig /flushdns

MacOS® 10.7 and 10.8

Click Applications.
Click Utilities.
Double-click the Terminal application.
Type the following command:
sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder
ALERT! Warning: To run this command, you will need to know the computer’s Admin account password.

MacOS 10.5 and 10.6

Click Applications.
Click Utilities.
Double-click the Terminal application.
Type the following command:
sudo dscacheutil -flushcache

If the command succeeds, the system does not return any output.

Warning:

To run this command, you must know the computer's administrator account password.

Apple OS X

Flushing the DNS in Mac OS X is an easy process, but the steps taken will depend on which version of OS X you are running.


macOS Sierra

If you are running Mac OS X 10.11, you need to follow the below steps:

Open up the command terminal.
Run the command sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

Mac OS X El Capitan

If you are running Mac OS X 10.11, you need to follow the below steps:

Open up the command terminal.
Run the command sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

Mac OS X Yosemite

If you are running Mac OS X 10.10, you need to follow the below steps:

Open up the command terminal.
Run the command sudo discoveryutil udnsflushcaches

Mac OS X Mavericks

If you are running Mac OS X 10.9, you need to follow the below steps:

Open up the command terminal.
Run the command sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

Mac OS X Mountain Lion

If you are running Mac OS X 10.8, you need to follow the below steps:

Open up the command terminal.
Run the command sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

Mac OS X Lion

If you are running Mac OS X 10.7, you need to follow the below steps:

Open up the command terminal.
Run the command sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

Mac OS X Snow Leopard

If you are running Mac OS X 10.6, you need to follow the below steps:

Open up a command terminal.
Run the command sudo dscacheutil -flushcache

Mac OS X Leopard and below

If you are running Mac OS X 10.5.1 or below, you need to follow the below steps:

Open a command terminal.
Run the command sudo lookupd -flushcache

Other Operating Systems


Linux

If you are running the nscd Name Service Cache Daemon and wish to flush your DNS cache, then you will need to do the following.

Open up a command terminal (either as root or run step 2 with sudo).
Run the command /etc/init.d/nscd restart

Conclusion

So if for example, your computer can not open a particular website, do not rush to re-install or taken to the repairman! It could be a problem in DNS cache. You need to delete DNS Cache first so that the website can be accessed.