Coronary Heart Disease

Coronary Heart Disease - The most common heart disease is coronary heart disease. This disease occurs, when the supply of oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle is blocked by the plaque in the heart's blood vessels or coronary arteries.

On the walls of the arteries can occur atherosclerosis conditions, i.e. the buildup of cholesterol and other substances, such as calcium and fibrin, which forms a blockage or plaques in the arteries. Plaque can form on the walls of the arteries even since someone is still young. But the more we get, the risk of the formation of the plaques will be higher. If left untreated, this plaque can eventually lead to reduced elastic arteries and disrupts the smooth flow of blood.


Coronary heart disease




The greater the plaque, then the more narrow the arteries of the heart, so that oxygen-rich blood supply to the heart will be a bit. Plaque can also loose-leaf and then clog up the majority until the entire flow of blood in the arteries. When this occurs the blood flow resistance on the coronary artery, then a heart attack can occur.




Some Causes of Coronary Heart Disease


So far, the exact cause of the formation of plaque in arteries is not yet known with certainty. However, the following can magnify the risk of someone experiencing atherosclerosis:

Smoking
Smoking is one of the factors that are most influential in the increased risk of coronary heart disease. Active smokers are predicted to have a 24% greater risk of coronary heart disease than non-smokers. The content of nicotine and carbon monoxide in cigarettes makes the heart work harder than normal.  these substances can also increase the risk of blood clots in the arteries. That wretched, other chemicals in cigarettes can also damage the lining of the coronary arteries, thus increasingly enlarging the risk of developing coronary heart disease.


Cholesterol
Too much bad cholesterol in your bloodstream can cause coronary heart disease. The type of cholesterol that makes the risk of coronary heart disease increases is low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol commonly referred to as ' evil '. Because of this, cholesterol has a tendency to stick and stockpiling in the coronary arteries.




Diabetes
Diabetics have a predictable risk doubling higher exposed to coronary heart disease. This is alleged because diabetics have a layer of the blood vessel walls are thicker. Coronary artery walls thick could disrupt the smooth flow of blood to the heart.





The occurrence of blood clotting
Blood clotting or thrombosis which occurs in the coronary arteries will inhibit the blood supply leading to the heart. Blood clotting process is closely related to other factors, such as the process of inflammation, high cholesterol levels, uncontrolled blood sugar, as well as stress.


High blood pressure
People with high blood pressure can also increase the risk of coronary heart disease. A person categorized has a high blood pressure if you have a systolic pressure in the range 130 mmHg or higher, or a diastolic pressure of 80 mmHg or more. Systolic pressure itself is defined as a measure of blood pressure when the heart is contracting to pump the blood out. While the diastolic blood pressure is the pressure when the heart muscle is stretched to fill the blood.



How to Prevent Coronary Heart Disease


To minimize the risk of developing coronary heart disease, there are several ways that you can do, including:

  • Do the exercise routine.
  • Apply patterns of healthy eating and balanced nutrition, expand fruit and vegetable intake, reduce foods containing cholesterol and excess salt.
  • Stop smoking.
  • Lose weight if it is excessive.
  • Control your blood pressure.
  • Control stress.
  • Enough rest. Research shows that a lack of sleep and hours of quality influence on the increased risk of developing coronary heart disease.


The perils of coronary heart disease will affect the quality of your life, it can even cause sudden death due to the heart attack. Therefore, immediately consult a doctor if you are exposed to a high risk of the disease, or instead has experienced symptoms of coronary heart disease, like chest pain that occurs when heavy activity or stress, shortness of breath, cold sweat, and chest pain that radiates to the arm and neck.